The latest data from MBRRACE-UK shows that 15 babies die every day in the UK either before, during or shortly after birth.

Furthermore, every day four babies die around their due date. Many of these lives could be saved with improvements both to care and to our understanding of why babies die and how to protect them.

While the number of deaths has fallen in recent years, this is no time to be complacent. The UK is moving three times slower than some other European countries to save lives. This needs to improve.

That’s why we’re running the #15babiesaday initiative, to highlight the appalling fact that 15 babies die before, during or shortly after birth in the UK every single day.
 

What can I do?

Find out how to support the #15babiesaday initiative, or donate to Sands to help us reduce the baby death rate in the UK.
 

The facts about baby death in 2017

  1. 15 babies die every day in the UK either before, during or shortly after birth[i].
     
  2. Every day 4 babies die around their due date[ii]. Many of these lives could be saved with improvements both to care and to our understanding of why babies die and how to protect them.
     
  3. Every year around 900 babies die or have a severe brain injury as a result of something that goes wrong during labour and birth around their due date[iii]. The majority of these tragedies could be avoided.
     
  4. While the number of deaths has fallen in recent years, this is no time to be complacent. We are moving 3 times slower[iv] than some other European countries to save lives.
     
  5. Research shows that when a baby dies before it is born and close to its due date, in six out of ten cases that death might have been prevented with different care[v]. In 2015 alone, 600 opportunities to save a life were missed OR Since 2015 when the government announced its ambition to halve baby deaths, 1200 opportunities to save a life have been missed.
     
  6. Families are too often sent home with poor explanations about their baby’s death. If hospitals don’t adequately investigate what happened, how can lessons be learned? Yet research shows that there is no local review of care for three-quarters of stillbirths at the end of pregnancy[vi], and even where reviews had been carried out few follow national guidance or involve parents.
    How can hospitals fulfil their legal Duty of Candour[vii] to be honest and clear about care that should have been better if they have not examined what happened?
     
  7. The safety and quality of maternity care across the UK continues to be a postcode lottery. The rate of mortality varies hugely from region to region[viii], reflecting a map of poverty and health inequality.
     
  8. One in 150 births ends in the death of a baby. With better information, women can be empowered to help minimise the risks and make the right choices for them about their pregnancy.
     
  9. One in 5 stillbirths is associated with smoking[ix]. In some parts of the UK up to one in four women smoke during pregnancy, yet some health care providers can’t afford support services for women to help them stop. The slashing of Public Health budgets is having fatal consequences.
     
  10. How can the government fulfil its plans for better and safer maternity care without the capacity to deliver it? Ever-increasing pressure on the maternity workforce is threatening safety: England alone needs 3,500 more midwives[x].
 

[i] MBRRACE-UK surveillance report on 2015 data

[ii] MBRRACE-UK surveillance report on 2015 data

[iii] RCOG Each Baby Counts, Key messages from 2015 report

[iv] Lancet Stillbirth Series 2016

[v] MBRRACE-UK Confidential Enquiry into Normally-formed Antepartum Term Stillbirths, 2015

[vi] MBRRACE-UK Confidential Enquiry into Normally-formed Antepartum Term Stillbirths, 2015

[viii] MBRRACE-UK surveillance report on 2015 data

[ix] MBRRACE-UK surveillance report on 2015 data